WRITING AND FUN!

Hi SEers! Denise here to share some youthful wisdom.

I asked my four-year-old granddaughter a question. “What are you going to do today?”

“Have fun.”

I loved her answer, and it brought a smile to my face. It also got me thinking about my feelings when I sit down to write. Am I having fun? I realized the answer was no. But why not? I’m doing what I love and meant to do, so what’s missing?

The definition of fun:

noun

something that provides mirth or amusement: A picnic would be fun.

enjoyment or playfulness: She’s full of fun.

verb (used with or without object), funned, fun·ning,

Informal. joke; kid.

adjective, fun ·ner, Fun ·nest.

Informal. of or relating to fun, especially to social fun: a fun thing to do; really a fun person; the funnest game.

Informal. whimsical; flamboyant: The fashions this year are definitely on the fun side. 

Courtesy of Dictionary.com

It was fun when I first started out writing, and I could poke good-natured fun at myself. I’d write to capture the ideas that seemed to flow from me. Nothing was off-limits, and no one saw it. I did whatever I wanted. I was writing for me.

Fast forward to now, when I write something, I have to consider who is seeing it, will it offend them, is the grammar perfect, is it interesting to others, will people comment on it, review it, or will someone disagree? There is no fun on that list, but it is a part of a writer’s life.

Yet, the reason I started writing was for the fun of it, along with it was a great way to get those stories down that floated around in my head.

So, why did I let it become a chore or a thing to check off my list when I completed a task? Writing isn’t the same as dusting or cleaning a toilet. Writing is an extension of who I am, and my inner child requires that I have some fun being me.

Little boy writing.

So, I put together a list of ways to bring the fun back into writing.

  1. Make your words express your voice and perspective.
  2. Share what’s in your heart.
  3. Write about those silly things that make you laugh.
  4. Remember the world through your eyes as a child? That awe still exists inside.
  5. Have that story that you thought no one would like? Write it anyway, with all your enthusiasm behind it. Those make the very best stories.
  6. Not what everyone else is doing or popular? Who cares—be yourself.
  7. Don’t worry about stats, reviews, opinions, word counts, deadlines, or critiques while you write. Channel that voice that’s been waiting for a turn to explore the world.
  8. Bring the things you love into your words. They belong there having fun with you.
People jumping around on beach at sunset

Although the idea of having fun seems to contradict the meaning behind the work and the sacrifice authors make to produce a great story, it isn’t. There is no rule that says you can’t have fun while writing.

I decided that starting this moment and into the future, I will actively choose to have fun when I write. I had fun writing this, thanks to the wise words of my granddaughter!

Do you have fun writing and do it for yourself? What are your secrets to keeping writing fun?

87 thoughts on “WRITING AND FUN!

  1. Wow, a nice read! Thank you! I love writing, and it was the most joyful time I had among the struggles I had to face for choosing this path. However, for the past few months, I hit the slump. I was not enjoying or having fun. I could clearly realize the change, and it hurt me because I knew that feeling. I was happy. And now it’s missed. The peer pressure had sucked it out of me. So, I did manage to write up to a set goal and then took a long break. I focused on self-care and healing. Later, I returned with fear, wondering if I would still enjoy the process. Guess what? I did. I loved the story and yearned to share it with everyone, so that spark was still alive, and it kept me going with enthusiasm. I wrote until I hit the anxiety again. And just like you said, whenever I sense the lack of fun, I put off writing and take a break, at least for a while. I understand that I am in a state of transformation right now, so, naturally, I hit slumps often. In the end, I wish to be happy. So, it’s worth the fight! I apologize if my thoughts ran wild and messy! Thank you for the post, and best wishes to you as well!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Childhood – Judi Lynn

  3. I absolutely love this post. I’ve always wanted to write, but thought it would be really hard to get into it because I type all day for a living and didn’t want to spend more time at the computer when I got off, but I just started my own blog, and I am completely surprised by how fun it is. Even though I write all day as a lawyer, creative writing and writing about books is a totally different thing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Kristi 🙂 I’m glad you enjoyed the post! It’s wonderful you are enjoying your blog and writing. I agree is it a completely different thing taping into our creative side.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Pingback: #ReblogAlert – This Week on #StoryEmpire | The Write Stuff

  5. Hi Denise, thank you for this! 😊 I’m a new author but I do understand losing and searching for fun as it’s happened many, many times in my day job. It’s been hard as an indie author, but there are fun parts to it too! I’ve just been telling myself not to worry so much and just take things one day at a time.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. What a sweet post, Denise, and the perfect comment from your granddaughter. So natural to just throw fun out as the goal of her day. I could relate to your post. Writing was more fun when I started. But for me, there are more external pressures now than there once were. That, in turn, puts pressure on the limited time I have to write. I’m going to think about this post for a while and ponder ways I can add more fun to writing. Thanks!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Diana 🙂 I always thought as I got older I would have so much extra time, but that’s not been the case. I’ve been the family caretaker, and it goes from one thing to another. At least now it’s down to my grandkids, and I enjoy their look at life, but I only have so much energy—as we all do. So, it’s something I think about often because I’ve seen how fast things go and refuse not to enjoy what time I have here. Happy and fun writing 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Your post obviously struck a chord, Denise. As I read through the comments, there were so many writers feeling the same way. I’m still caretaking on both ends, and though I’m happy to do it, its not exactly what I’d call “fun.” My writing time is so squeezed that I put pressure on myself to product. I guess I need to stop that. Thanks again for the great post. Lots to reflect on.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. An excellent post, Denise! Fun is such an important element in our lives but there comes a point as an adult when it becomes associated with irresponsibility and lack of maturity. I know plenty of people who focused on some time in the future when they’d stop grafting and have fun. For many of them, that time never came. Each day is precious and not something for us to simply ‘get through’. Factoring in a little fun every day certainly makes the present more fulfilling. x

    Liked by 3 people

    • I agree we should never wait to have fun, because as you said, sometimes that moment never comes for us. Thank you, Alex and here’s to having a lot of fun today 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. This post fits exactly into how I’ve been feeling, Denise. Writing (the thing I take such joy from) had seized being fun and turned into a dreaded chore- worse than dishes even! Much of it is my own fault. I made commitments to box sets that forced me into a time constraint, which in turn, created a growing resentment until I began to do everything but open my WIP until there was no choice. Ugh!
    Over the summer, I took stock of the situation and decided if I wanted to continue writing (I do!) I needed to slow down and smell the roses, so to speak. I regretfully canceled out of the Christmas set I had agreed to and immediately felt a heavy weight lift. My book is still up on pre-order, so I still have a deadline, but it’s a more manageable one. And who knows, maybe next time I won’t even do a preorder. I plan to put the fun back into my writing, even if it takes me longer to publish.

    Liked by 4 people

    • It should never be a chore and I know life can add the weight sometimes, but I’m glad to hear you are working your way around it and slowing down. I’ve been doing some short stories, but just the fun of it lately. Then I can take off in any direction I want 🙂 I’m not sure how I feel about doing outside challenges over doing my own, but it’s what I needed. In the book I’m working on I’m letting myself take my time. Pre-orders do add extra stress, still not sure how I feel about them either. Yay for boundaries and doing what we love!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Some words are hard for me to define, and “fun” is one of them, because I can always see something in everything I do that I can do better. Yeah, I might not be the “funnest” person:) So, I’m not sure writing has ever been fun for me, but it’s always been fulfilling and satisfying. It still is when I can enter my characters’ world and see it through their eyes, when I can convey who they are and what the story is they want to tell. I hope the joy of writing comes back for you. Your granddaughter is a wise person:)

    Liked by 3 people

    • It is a hard word and why I thought about it after my granddaughter said it. She was wise and reminded me to enjoy what I do. I can’t say I’m all that funny either, although I like to think so sometimes. Fulfilling has come up often today and another word I will be thinking about because it’s true about why and the outcome of writing. Nothing like looking through our character’s eyes and telling their story, I agree. Thanks, Judi 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I seldom care what others think of me or what I write. I know that I cannot please everyone, and I am okay with that. The characters and their world make me smile and that is what counts with me. Many times, my characters make it into other worlds of mine or into short stories. Life is to short to worry about always pleasing others. If I didn’t have fun doing it, I would stop. Just my two cents.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I love your two cents, Michele 🙂 Life is short and we definitely can’t please everyone. Making yourself smile when writing is the best part of it. It is a gift to realize this.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I found there was so much to learn. I’m still learning and probably always will be but once it becomes a part of my writing I don’t think about it. But what I write about I want to enjoy that part to the fullest. Thank you, Annabelle 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Annita 🙂 I’m happy you decided to start your own blog to compliment your book writing. I’m glad you found this post useful!

      Like

  11. Great post, Denise. The only writing that is fun for me is my blog. There I don’t have to worry about controlling my writing voice. I just let it all hang out. In my novels, I have a more difficult time. I think the worry over construction, story, flow, and finish is enough to cause me to wonder why I write novels in the first place. After all, once they are finished, the daunting marketing efforts needed almost guarantee they will reach a minimal number of readers. The net is the latest novels take longer with each one. Working on them is a chore. I’ve really come to look forward to my posts and deal with the realities of the books. Thanks for letting me ramble.

    Liked by 5 people

  12. What a beautiful reminder, Denise. I started to write a blog not too long back about when writing becomes a chore and not a joy, but never got it done, so I am thrilled that the muse moved on to you. 🙂 That’s what it does, you know. 🙂 I totally agree with you. If we don’t enjoy it anymore, yet it is what we love, we have to look deeper and I think you nailed it. Instead of letting the story flow from the heart, we start thinking about the readers and doubting ourselves and fretting over whether or not they will love it. Like you said, it doesn’t matter. We know we aren’t doing this to make a million dollars. So, we just need to relax and be that channel for the story. Thank you SO much for sharing this!!! Hugs!

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you, Jan 🙂 I’m glad the muse found its way to me through my granddaughter. I was searching for a topic and this came! Yes, we may love writing but like any good relationship, we need to hang on to why we love it. We need to push away that doubt and embrace it with that inner youth wisdom. No, certainly aren’t doing this to become rich that is for sure! Yes, channel the story happens and flows if we get out of our head and let our heart take over 😉 Hugs right back.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. You nailed it with this post, Denise. When we first start our writing journey, it’s a magical time. But we don’t know what we don’t know. As we hone our craft, writing gets harder and each book takes longer to write (in my case, anyway), because we care about reader expectations. That doesn’t mean we still can’t have fun inside our fictional worlds. I love crawling into my writer’s cave. It’s also work, but work can and should be fun. 😀

    Liked by 4 people

    • Thank you, Sue 🙂 Each book does seem harder to write because we learn so much along the way, which is a good thing. Applying it to our current work requires more thought and time. It can be stressful before it becomes natural, I’ve noticed. But writing it should be the fun part and the tidying up a necessary worry for later, at least for me. Nothing like climbing into that writer’s cave and exploring!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I have to agree with Robbie. I find fulfillment in creating my stories. When the words are flowing and the plot points piece together in perfect symmetry or my characters do something to surprise me, it’s a heck of a lot of fun. When I’m struggling with my muse that’s a little different. And when it comes time for promoting what I’ve written, well—I think most writers would rather skip that and move onto the next story.

    I also think it’s important (as you and Staci pointed out) to never lose the sense of wonder we have in childhood. I’ve tried to hold onto that all my life, and I like channeling that into my writing. This was an excellent post today, Denise, and a wonderful reminder of why we first started writing. I’ve always said even if no one ever read my work I’d never stop writing for my own enjoyment!

    Liked by 5 people

    • Fulfillment is a good word to decribe the outcome of writing. One I will be thinking about 🙂 There is nothing better than when the words flow and everything fits together perfectly. It surprises me each time. Yes, promoting is the worse part but maybe that inner child has some fun ideas for that. I hope so! Hanging on to that sense of wonder makes all the difference in every part of our lives. I agree even if no read what I wrote, I’d still feel compelled write it. Which is why I have years of stories waiting to be rediscovered. Thank you, Mae 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  15. Beautifully captured, Denise. “Fun” makes a difference in the final product. It’s important to edit, rework, and rewrite but unless there’s fun or joy, the writing suffers. It becomes more mechanical, and for readers, less magnetic. I love your examples and your suggestions. 💗

    Liked by 6 people

    • Thank you, Gwen 🙂 Writing does suffer if the heart isn’t in it, which makes editing so much harder after. I can see the difference when I had fun writing or not. Not all my fun ones were successful but I’m ok with that because I enjoyed writing them. We can always clean up a story that has heart but fixing one that mechanical is really hard to do.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Your fun shines through in your stories, Craig 🙂 Yes, there is always going to be worry and struggle along the way but it shouldn’t be the focus of the writing.
      Thank you, Craig!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. From the mouths of babes. Wise words, Denise. Something you said struck me as I’m dealing with something in my WIP that could offend some readers. I’ve debated on what to do but I’ve wanted to write this book (with that storyline) for a long time. I need to write for fun, then deal with the edits and whatever else is needed.

    Thanks for a great post.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Yes, little ones have a beautiful way of looking and approaching life. I hate worrying about offending someone, especially writing kid’s books. Writing for adults, I figure they can stop reading and move on if they don’t like it. Tree Fairies worried me a bit with some topics but in the end I followed my heart with that and was glad I did. I hope you write it, Joan and enjoy every moment of it! Thank you 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  17. God bless your granddaughter. My kids and I (both adults now, and my daughter is expecting) have been talking a lot lately about the innocence of youth and the responsibilities of adulthood. They never understood me when they were children and would whine and say they couldn’t wait until they were grown up and could have fun and do whatever they wanted, and I would tell them to enjoy their youth because adulthood wasn’t the way they thought. Now, they know. The reality doesn’t measure up to their earlier perceptions. One of my daily prayers is that each of us can find some of the joys and freedoms of childhood again. We’ve all been living under a cloud of obligation that’s sucking the pleasure out of life for too long. We could all use this reminder. So glad you posted this today.

    Liked by 9 people

    • I told my kids the very same thing. Being an adult is hard but losing that innocence of childhood even harder. Sadly one of my adult children has concluded adulthood is meant to be hard and lacking that innocent wonder and hope. At that point I made sure I embraced the childlike innocence again to offer both sides and some hope. What a beautiful prayer to offer daily and why I keep saying embrace that inner child. They are very wise if we pay attention. Thank you, Staci 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m sorry your child feels that way. But it’s an easy trap to fall into. Kudos to you for trying to pick up the slack. I pray it makes all the difference and he or she finds wonder and whimsy once more.

        Liked by 1 person

    • I think we all warn our kids not to grow up too fast. I loved your line: “We’ve all been living under a cloud of obligation that’s sucking the pleasure out of life for too long.” So true. Denise’s post was a wonderful reminder to seek our joy and hang onto it.

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Wisdom out of the mouths of babes! Love it. ❤ I have definitely been looking at my writing as a chore lately, which is why I keep pushing it away. Lol! And you are right – perspective is everything. I am going to carve out some time to have fun with my writing this week and enjoy my creations. Thanks, Denise! 🙂

    Liked by 4 people

    • It’s true children have so much insight to offer that we’ve forgotten. You make a good point who likes chores? But if it’s fun, then that’s so different and we want to do it. Yes, enjoy your beautiful creations and have some fun with them! Thanks, Yvette 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Like you, it was fun when I started out, but not so much anymore. I need to recapture that joy and ease. Your list is great. In recent years I understood that I needed to stop editing/censoring as I write, and that helped immensely. I’ll have to adopt your other suggestions too. Thanks for sharing, Denise 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

    • I can’t write and edit at the same time either. It stops the flow of creativity and the possibilities that are waiting to be found. It makes me a slow writer but I don’t mind. Thanks, Harmony and hope you slip into that ease 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Jill:) I can write without my heart in it but it isn’t the same and requires a lot of editing after if it’s fixable. It’s wonderful you can step back and put it aside and come back fresh!

      Liked by 1 person

  20. All too often lately, I find myself doing all the necessary things, pushing my writing to the back of my mind (and desk!)
    Not sure when this change happened, as I always used to write first thing in the morning, before life wakes up and catches me…

    Liked by 5 people

  21. For me “fulfilling” is closer than “fun” with my writing… or it is with the strict dictionary definition of fun. I gives me enormous pleasure, but I’m usually intent on subtly working in a serious message. However, I have my moments. There’s one in my latest book where the DCI tests a theory, is arrested for kerb crawling by a uniformed officer, and then realises his forgotten his identity card.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Fulfilling is a good thing for your writing to be, Sarah. It is true some of the darker side of life would fall more one that side. That’s definitely an opps to forget his ID card in that situation 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  22. Pingback: Stop by and say hi! WRITING AND FUN #storyempire #writing community #indieauthors – Author D.L. Finn

  23. I love this post, Denise. It’s so timely. I’ve written some fun things and fun posts when I first started blogging seriously five years ago (I registered the blog about 10 years ago). I just revisited those writing last few months and wanted to do something about them.

    Liked by 7 people

  24. HI Denise, I am glad you have found your way back to making writing fun. I wouldn’t use the word fun to describe my writing, I would chose the word fulfilling. I feel fulfilled when I write about historical events I think are important to remember and I get pleasure from that fulfilment. I write mainly for my own personal pleasure and fulfilment and I hope others will enjoy what I have written and share my pleasure, but that isn’t my primary goal. I think this keeps the fun in writing for me. I will be interested in what other writers think about this topic, because I can see how easily the fun element could disappear.

    Liked by 6 people

    • What a good way to describe how writing makes you fulfilled and then brings pleasure. It is fun to write for ourselves, though, and easy if we lose sight of that. Thanks, Robbie

      Liked by 3 people

We'd love to know what you think. Comment below.

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s