Why Do You Write? #authors #writers

Hi, SEers! Mae here with a simple—or maybe not so simple—question.

Why do you write?

What compels you to spend hours, days, weeks, months or more, crafting a single story? Why does the story form in your head to begin with? Is it birthed from characters who won’t leave you alone, or does it form as a plot with grayed out faces? Once you tell a tale, why do you go back to the drawing board and start another? What spurs you to create?

You may be familiar with a quote that runs along the lines of “if you’re a writer, your days are spent writing or thinking about writing.”

woman sitting on couch, typing on laptop

I know that’s true for me. Rarely does a day pass when I’m not engaged in one or the other. I find it mind-boggling other people can walk around giving absolutely no thought to crafting fiction. For those of us who live and breathe writing, that seems impossible. Yet only a small percentage of the population identifies as writers—despite over 81 percent thinking they have a book in them.  

How often have you heard someone say, “I think I’ll write a book.”

I equate that to me saying “I think I’ll paint a sunset.” I might be able to visualize a sunset, imagining the tapestry of colors and the way those hues melt into the horizon. I may see it perfectly in my head, but I’d be clueless how to transfer that vision onto canvas. I respect the skill of an artist, just as I respect the skill of a musician. Strange you never hear anyone say, “I think I’ll compose a song,” or “I think I’ll paint a picture.” But mention you’re a writer and a complete stranger will tell you, “I’ve always thought I should write a book.”

Part of me wants to think they’re just being chatty and trying to find common ground. The other part mentally runs through the years I’ve dedicated to the craft, the intricate nuts-and-bolts of technique I’ve had to learn, the long hours of nurturing a story, wrestling with characters, writing, revising, editing, networking, marketing. I usually end up smiling and telling the would-be-novelist to give it a whirl—that it’s a highly rewarding experience.

But in the trenches, we know reward is minimal. For the bulk of us, there is no big paycheck when the book is done. No public accolades, reviews in major publications, or rounds visiting the talk show circuit. But there is satisfaction. We’ve told our tale, giving rein to those characters who clamor in our heads, to story ideas that refuse to fade into oblivion. We publish, and are thankful to have readers and reviews, even if we’re not on the NYT Bestseller list.

So, I’ll ask again—why do you write?

If no one ever read a word you’d written again, would you still write? Would you spend long hours of story building, drafting, revising, and editing if the only person ever to see your work was you?

Think about it. Then tell me your thoughts in the comments below. Let’s get some discussion going!

Ready, set, go!

bio box for author, Mae Clair

105 thoughts on “Why Do You Write? #authors #writers

  1. I’ve thought about that myself–whether I’d write if no one read it–and change my mind often. I’m not sure. It is a ton of work if just for me. That sounds selfish. Should I instead volunteer in a pet sanctuary? Maybe…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi, Esther. Need and Must are two of my reasons for writing as well, and I love creating characters. One day, perhaps you’ll want to share your books with others, but whatever your path, I wish you happy writing. Thank you for visiting and adding to the discussion with your thoughts!

      Like

    • Hi, team plastic. Isn’t it amazing how many storylines and characters can crowd into our heads? Writing is all those things you said. Thanks for visiting and sharing!

      Like

  2. I just write to share things, sometimes to conduct lightning, otherwise to shine light on somebody’s path. I don’t write to attract audiences. I only write for that one person who needed to know.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Thank you for posing this thought-provoking question, Mae! I’ve always enjoyed writing, but only published my first book late in life. I write stories I enjoy reading, which is helpful when I have to read them over and over during the self-editing process. They come to me in visions and dreams and random thoughts, and once the characters come to life, they nudge and cajole until their story has been told. Writing is my happy place. It’s the most satisfying work I have ever done. When someone else reads and enjoys what I’ve written, my heart fills with joy and all the colors I see become brighter. If no one reads what I write, I’ll catch up on reading for pleasure.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I feel much the same way you do the it comes to writing. Like you, I find it so satisfying when someone else reads and enjoys my work, but if no one reads what I write, I still take pleasure in my stories and books myself. Writing is definitely a happy place for me, too. I am so glad you enjoyed the post, and dropped by to share!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. If no one ever read my work, I know for a fact I would still write and think about writing all the time. I never started writing with the purpose of pleasing a crowd or spreading a story, though I admit it would be nice. Writing clears my mind and helps me get my creativity out if my sometimes uncontrollable imagination. Great post!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hi, Marcial. I’m with you 100% on that I would still write even if no one read my work. I started writing stories at such a young age, they were definitely only for me. I even remember jealously guarding them from others for a long period (with the exception of my parents and a few close friends).
      Writing is a great outlet for creativity, and I’ve found that sharing my work with others is a pleasure as well. Thank you for sharing your thoughts today. Writing has made such an impact on so many of us!

      Like

  5. I write because I enjoy losing myself in my imaginary world. I enjoy being alone in my thoughts and seeing what decorates the page. I don’t think I’d ever stop writing, even in no one read it, because I find it therapeutic. Great post, Mae! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • I find it therapeutic too, Yvette, and like you would never stop writing even if I was the only one who ever read my work. I love creating worlds and characters too much. It seems the bulk of us feel that way.
      So glad you enjoyed the post. Many thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: Why Do You Write? #authors #writers – Nelsapy

  7. HI Mae, a most interesting question. Do I have to write. I don’t think so. I like to write and I enjoy it, but if no-one was ever going to read anything I wrote, I don’t think I would. I think I would find another interest to channel my energy into. I do my cake artwork and perhaps I would try painting and paint the sunset. I can’t say with honesty that I haven’t thought about trying out painting and also sculpture. I started my blog so that I would have somewhere to share my writing and become part of a group of people who also like to share and read writing and poetry. I don’t mind not making money out of it, but I do want that community and the pleasure of sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Robbie, I love your response about being part of the writing/blogging community and having the pleasure of sharing. That’s a wonderful thought!
      You have a lot of other interests so I can see where you would say you don’t need to write if it came down to it. You’d channel your energies elsewhere. For me, my only driving passions is writing, so I know it’s something I’ll never abandon regardless of sharing. I do find pleasure in reading my own work and spending time with the characters I’ve created.
      If you do try painting or sculpture I’m sure you’ll apply yourself to it. My father was a classically trained artist, but I never inherited that gene or had a desire to try painting. He did, however, dabble with writing, and passed that onto me 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Mae, this is a great and encouraging community and I love being part of it. I recall that your father was an artist. My father wanted to be an artist but his family wouldn’t here of it. My grandmother was quite a good painter. One day I epect to give painting a go.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Robbie, you definitely have painting and art in your genes. I fully expect you will give it a go one day, too.
        I love our blogging community as well. I wish I had more time to devote to it!

        Like

  8. I write because it’s always been inside of me. I wrote my first short story at age eight. When I was ten, I co-wrote a play that was performed in front of the entire school. But even before I ever learned to write, I had an imagination full of stories that I played out in my head daily. As I grew older, and fell headlong into my love of reading, I began to understand my calling. If my words were left unread, as long as I wrote them down, I’m satisfied. I am humbly grateful to those who have read and reviewed my work. But the biggest thrill for me is reaching that point in my stories where the final words are The End. You’ve written a wonderfully thought-provoking post, Mae. Well done.

    Liked by 4 people

    • The entire school, Beem? What an accomplishment! I can only imagine how good you must have felt.
      I love the idea that even before we, as writers, put pen to paper stories were already alive and spinning in our heads. So many of us started the craft in childhood. When you pause to think of how many years—okay, decades–that passion has driven us, it speaks volumes. Like you, I am honored and humbled that others have enjoyed my work and taken the time to leave reviews. What a glow that brings! It’s most certainly encouragement to keep going. Of course, even without that, I would still be that kid penning stories that no one ever read but me.
      So glad you enjoyed the post. Thank you for weighing in with your thoughts today!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I was given no choice about writing. Stories find me not only in my waking hours but in my dreams. But like you said its more than writing them down, there is so much to learn once they are written and a whole other part to it. I hear that often, too, people saying they should write a book, and if I offer any advice I notice they aren’t listening. I keep thinking this is my last book, but so far I’ve been wrong. Great post, Mae 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • Nooo! It can’t be your last book, Denise. I know you have far more stories to tell, and an audience eager to read them!
      I like what you said about not being given a choice about writing—that stories find you during waking moments and dreams and insist on being written down. Those pesky story ideas are relentless in chasing us, LOL.

      It’s amazing the people I’ve encountered who have told me they should/want/plan to write a book. Only one of them has seriously moved ahead with it, and he’s taken to heart the advice I’ve given him. Otherwise it’s usually glossed over in a conversation. I’ve also had a number of people suggest that I should write their life story. Um….no, thanks, I’ve got a ton of ideas on my own! 🙂

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts today. I wish you happy writing!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I write because I have to. There are stories and poems inside me that need to come out, so I write them down. And, yes, I’d still keep doing it even if nobody but me was ever going to see it. I publish because I feel that art in all its forms – stories, poems, songs, etc – should be shared, and because I’d like people to have the chance to share mine if they want to. But I’d keep writing even if I never published a thing, because I have to; because it’s part of who I am, and the voices inside my head won’t be silenced.

    Liked by 4 people

    • Well said, Tori! I do think work is created to be shared, and is best when enjoyed by others. But like you, writing is part of who I am, as essential as breathing.
      When others purchase and/or review my work, it makes the effort of writing that much more rewarding. I’m sure you feel the same.
      Thanks so much for sharing today and adding to the discussion!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. “I find it mind-boggling other people can walk around giving absolutely no thought to crafting fiction.” Lol. That line cracked me up, Mae. I love this post. I think I started writing because it felt like I was channeling another universe. It was soooo amazing and exciting. Then I learned that most writers feel that way and I wasn’t actually tapping into another dimension. The balloon popped a little, but by then, it didn’t matter – I was hooked. Would I still write if not a soul read my books? Probably not, since I have lots of interests that are sorely neglected. I’ve always written to be read, not to make money or be a best seller, but to have moved or entertained someone, somewhere. ❤

    Liked by 6 people

    • LOL! Glad you enjoyed that line, Diana. It’s so true, right? When I was a kid, I assumed everyone thought like I did, dreaming about characters and other worlds. I still remember being shocked the first time I realized that not everyone had a driving, all-consuming passion that lived in their head 24/7. Gawp!!

      You are fortunate to have other interests that would consume your time if you weren’t writing. My other interests come down to reading and learning, both of which would lead me back to writing, so for me I’d keep creating stories without anyone reading them. I do like what you said about writing to be read, not to make money. I remember telling my husband the same thing when I started publishing. It wasn’t about earnings, but about having my work “out there.” Of course, I wouldn’t mind some of those earnings to go along with the passion, LOL.

      I am so glad you enjoyed the post. And for the record, your books always entertain!

      Liked by 2 people

  12. This post gives me a lot to think about. I have been crafting stories since I was young. Some myself, some with my best friend. I love creating a world, giving life to a character, giving a villain a positive trait that makes them relatable. It frustrates me, it gives me pleasure, it gives me a something to talk about with my friends, It gives me a way to make people happy. Even if only a few people read with I have written, it’s still rewarding.

    Liked by 4 people

    • A great answer, Michele. I agree with everything you said, and it brings back memories of writing with my friends when I was young. We even had a writing club, and would discuss our ideas and stories. All the work that goes into crafting a book is so much more rewarding when you have someone to share it with. In my younger days, with my simple stories, that was my group of friends, but that audience grew as I did. Like you, even if only a few people read what I’ve written, it’s still rewarding. Even just completing a ms for myself gives me a sense of satisfaction–though, of course, I’d love a big audience, LOL.

      Thanks for sharing your thoughts today. I wish you happy writing!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. This is a tough question, and I’m not sure of my answer. I THINK I’d keep writing, because like John, I get restless when I don’t. But if I knew, for sure, that not one person would read my work, I might get too discouraged. There’s always the hope that someone will read it and like it. I’ve always had just enough success, getting published in small anthologies or magazines, that I stayed hopeful. It meant someone liked my work. I’d love to have more success, but I don’t know if I could continue with no success or feedback at all. Maybe, but I’m not sure.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Having an audience is definitely motivation for writing, Judi. I agree with you on that one.
      I do know a few writers who have told me they wouldn’t continue if not for the audience. For myself, I have to get stories down, and characters out of my head. I’m compelled to write, regardless if there is an audience, but I much prefer having one! Let’s hope we never have to face crickets when we’ve finished a manuscript, LOL!
      Thanks for adding to the discussion today!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I’m like the majority here. I started writing when I was six and have been doing so ever since. Like Mae, I wrote my first story when I was six with no intended audience. In primary school aged nine or ten I had a couple of plays performed by my class – I did those so that I could dress up and play the lead… There is a compusion to free the characters circling in my head by putting them down on paper. When someone does read something I’ve written and lets me know that it’s given them pleasure, the happiness that bubbles up is immense and makes it all worthwhile. I’ve read so much from this community that should be reaching a wider audience but that’s not going to stop any of us from carrying on! Great post, Mae!

    Liked by 6 people

    • Trish, I remember friends and me acting out plays I had written in junior high. We did perform one in front of a class but that was only because it was part of the curriculum and I was the writer the group depended on. I definitely did NOT take the lead though. I’m more of a behind-the-scenes type of person. The other plays, we would read in study hall in an empty auditorium. I’d forgotten those wonderful memories until your reply sparked the memory.

      How fabulous that you and I both started writing at the same age! I do agree that there is immense pleasure to be had when someone reads my work and tells me how much they enjoyed it. That has always been part of the goal, but those character and story ideas would spill out regardless. I’ve loved hearing everyone’s thoughts in regards to this question. I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Thanks so much for sharing your thoughts and adding to the discussion today!

      Liked by 1 person

  15. You pose challenging questions, Mae. I’m not sure I have the answer as to why I write. I know when I’m not writing, I feel discontent. Not misery pe see but an unsettled feeling that goes away when my words hit the screen. I think it might be like someone who loved to drive a car and feels out of place when that is not happening. Also, you asked if no one ever read another word I wrote would I keep writing? Since I write to quell that uneasy feeling, I would say yes. Part of my answer is built on the idea that I don’t really understand why people would read what I write in the first place. I think this leads to the idea of writing for myself. Awesome post today.

    Liked by 7 people

    • An unsettled feeling. That’s a good way of putting it, John. I can definitely relate to feeling that way when I’m not writing—when the tug to return to the keyboard is so strong there’s simply no way to resist. And when it happens, it’s like an itch scratch, a need met.
      I like that you would and do write for yourself, but isn’t it great there is an audience out there for your stories? I know I love them. Until we put our stories in published form, we don’t realize exactly how many people are eager to read them.

      Thanks for weighing in with your thoughts today. I’m so glad you enjoyed the post and the discussion. It seems all of us write primarily for our own enjoyment, wich I consider a good thing!

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Excellent post Mae. This question always send my mind into overdrive, no matter how many times I try to answer it. I write because I have to. Ever since I was a child I have always had stories forming in my head in one form or another. Some days I have to get something out on paper to make room for all the other stuff boiling up. I write for connection and also as a form of meditation and freedom. Anything that comes after that is a bonus. Some great responses to your question on here.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hi, Davyd. It is a hard question to answer, isn’t it? I think only other writers understand the inherent need to craft stories. Like you, I’ve had characters and other worlds bouncing around in my head since childhood. They’re definitely persistent in wanting to be developed in written form. Writing can certainly be a relaxing exercise so I like your viewpoint of it being used for a form of meditation–and, of course, freedom from the daily grind of life.
      I’m so glad you stopped by to share your thoughts, and are enjoying the discussion in the comments!

      Liked by 2 people

  17. I feel the same way, Mae. I write because I can’t not write. It’s embedded in my soul and it affects me in numerous ways. I’m happier when I’ve had a good writing day; I feel low when I don’t. Writing is the medicine that keeps me whole and grounded. The thought of never having anyone read my work is depressing, though. Touching someone’s life, even if it’s only to allow them to escape real life for a while, drives me to the keyboard day after day.

    Liked by 6 people

    • I think part of why we write is to share our stories, Sue. I know I do. Having someone enjoy a book I’ve worked hard at, makes all that effort worthwhile. But like you, I wouldn’t NOT be able to write even if I knew I had no audience. I like what you said about writing being embedded in your soul. What a great thought, and so true for those of us driven to create!

      Liked by 2 people

  18. One of my favorite places is the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. I can get lost there, walking among the greats. With each painting, I travel — not simply through time, but through the mind. Who is this painter? Whistler, da Vinci, Dali, Monet. What lies behind the paint strokes? I stand and wait for the painter to appear. Always. When I read, I do the same. A story is a story, but the writer gives it life. I want to know the writer, as I want to know the painter. I want to step inside his or her world and understand what he or she sees or wants to communicate. Once this occurs, a friend is born. When I write, I share something of my heart. Whether it is seen or not seen, it is my gift and it will always be offered. Finding friends along the way is the reward.

    Liked by 5 people

    • That is so beautifully expressed, Gwen.
      It’s amazing the journeys authors (and other artists) take us on. I have become fans of many writers through their work, following them faithfully to each new world. I hope when others read my stories I’m able to leave something of myself behind that resonates, as so many do in their novels.
      Thanks for joining in the discussion today and sharing your thoughts. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  19. I often ask myself this same question, Mae. Coming into the writing field a little late to the party, so to speak, there is no simple answer. I wrote the first four books because I had a true story burning to be told. Then I thought I’d be done. But through the course of creating those first biographical fiction books, more story ideas started coming. A single line in a song can trigger a story. A bumper sticker on the car in front of me can trigger a story. I guess you could say I morphed from being an avid reader to a writer. Perhaps it was there all along and life had to come around to the point that I could come out of the closet and act on it. I don’t know. But I tell people (especially my children) who ask me why I continue to toil away with no monetary rewards, “As long as the stories keep coming, I’ll keep writing.” I do it to satisfy the characters who choose me to tell their story through. The journey of writing and publishing stories is not an easy one, but like you, when someone tells me they think they need to write a book, I say “go for it.” Great question.

    Liked by 5 people

    • I know of many writers who came to the craft later in life, Jan, and love it with the same strong passion of those who have courted writing from an early age. It appears you were bitten by the writer bug, and I for one, am glad it found you. 🙂
      Our monetary reward might be small, but the satisfaction we gain from telling stories is well worth the effort we put into our novels.
      Thanks for sharing your thoughts today. I’m so glad you enjoyed the post and the discussion it’s provoked.

      Liked by 1 person

  20. I write primarily for my own entertainment. I would keep doing it with no audience. I’ve even considered going down that path recently. Promo and publishing are a lot of work if the readership isn’t there. Then I think, maybe there are some who might enjoy my stories, so I publish.

    Liked by 5 people

  21. After 11 years, my first blog post has three ‘Likes’ – I kept on writing. I think I would write even if no one read anything. Crafting the story is my entertainment. It’s work, but it’s work like any other craft, work I am capable of doing. Every situation might no be unique, but the stories are. That’s good enough for me. Thanks for asking a very interesting question, Mae. I will enjoy reading the other comments.

    Liked by 6 people

    • Hi, Dan. Thanks for weighing in with your thoughts.
      I remember those early days of blogging. Isn’t it amazing when you look back on those first few posts and know that you built an audience from there?

      You are so right about stories being work. No one other than a someone dedicated to their craft would invest the time a writer does–taking a project from idea to final draft. It’s a labor of love for sure. I’m so glad you hear you enjoy it, and that you also enjoyed the post. Lots of good thoughts in the comments so far. It seems all of us are in it for the long haul whether or not anyone reads our work. Of course, it’s nice to have that icing on the cake! 🙂

      Liked by 4 people

  22. I have always loved to write, from the time I could hold a pencil. one of my early writings was a note to the tooth fairy that my mom kept. most of my writing is unread, other than short snippets on my blog

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hi, Beth. I love that your mom kept that early writing to the tooth fairy. It’s great you’ve had the passion for creating stories since you were young. I’m the same way, and started writing when I was six. I’ve never stopped and never plan to.
      I’m also glad you’re sharing snippets of your writing on your blog. In time, perhaps you’ll want to publish as well but whatever you decide, the bottom line is that you’re writing for you and enjoying it! Thanks for sharing today!

      Liked by 3 people

  23. Yes, I would write even if no one read it. I’d write even if I was the only soul on the planet who ends up reading it. Because in the end, I write for me. I write, because I want to see that story that’s been in my head be put down on paper to be read, even if only by me. Someone once said there is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside of you, and I cannot get over how true that is.

    A beautiful post❤

    Liked by 5 people

    • Reeydah, I love how you expressed the need and desire to write. I agree with everything you said 100%. I have heard the quote you referenced, and it’s so true. As writers, those ideas inside of us beg to be put on paper in story form, even if no one else ever chances to read them.
      I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Thank you for sharing your thoughts today. I wish you happy writing! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  24. Why do I write? Because it’s something I’ve wanted to do since I was ten years old. Probably before then, but it wasn’t until that age that I realized it. Yes, I would write if no one read. I have stories within me that beg to be put on paper (or digital format).

    You’ve given me lots of food for thought today, Mae.

    Liked by 6 people

    • So glad I’ve given you food for thought, Joan!
      I think only another writer (or perhaps artist) understands why writers are so driven to create. It’s not something dependent upon publication or audience, it’s just something we HAVE to do. Like you, I’ve been writing since childhood, and the stories just won’t stop. I don’t think they ever will, LOL, and I’m fine with that! 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  25. I can’t stop the ideas from coming, and at some point they HAVE to spill onto the page, even if nobody ever reads them. I’ve written since a young age, and I think my brain is just wired that way, much like other artists. Thought-provoking post, Mae 💕🙂

    Liked by 6 people

    • I love what you said, Harmony. The ideas won’t stop and they HAVE to spill onto the page. Like you, I’ve been writing since I was a child. I find when I’m away from it for a period of time I start to suffer a kind of withdrawal. It’s a NEED I have to fulfill, so I will never stop writing even if no one reads a word.
      So glad you enjoyed the post!

      Liked by 2 people

  26. I’ve always enjoyed writing, I became more serious about my hobby as a way to cope with my mother’s diagnosis of Alzheimer’s. Although writing under contract can be stressful at times, it’s my way to deal with things that are out of my control. I hope you and your husband are doing okay, Mae.

    Liked by 5 people

    • Hi, Jill. First, thank you so much for the kind thoughts. We are doing well. It’s been a crazy stressful time for a number of reasons but all is well. ❤️💕

      I haven’t had to write to a contract deadline for a number of years but I do remember it being stressful. I also remember it forcing me to concentrate and produce work that I might have slacked off on otherwise. I am sorry to hear the reason you started writing, but I am thankful that something good came from that situation. I love your stories and find them a warm blessing in book form.

      Liked by 4 people

  27. I would write novels even if nobody read them. But art of any kind had its own life and artists need receivers of their art to complete the circle. Art also in many cases exists beyond our own lifetime. We just have to produce our best work. Take joy in the process. And when it is done let it go. Like letting go of a balloon. Who knows it’s journey?

    Liked by 7 people

  28. I write and publish but only a few people have actually read the words which “I thought were inspired”. Even so, this does not stop me from writing. I like to start with an idea or a character. I don’t necessarily plan where the story is going, I’m committed to letting the story emerge. I am often amazed after a writing session with the words – the ideas and the characters – which have begun to take shape in the emerging story.

    Liked by 9 people

    • I’m much like you in that I usually start with a character, then let the story emerge as I work. It is amazing the twists and turns stories take on their own, driven by our characters, isn’t it. I’m glad that even though only a few people have read what you’ve written (per your comment), you continue to write and publish. Most of us have a small audience but it’s the passion for writing that keeps us going. Thanks for sharing your thoughts today!

      Liked by 3 people

  29. I guess I’d write if no one read what I wrote because I’ve been writing since I was young and still am. No one read that early work, and I don’t have a huge audience now. But the stories keep popping into my head, so I put them to page.

    Thought-provoking post, Mae.

    Liked by 10 people

    • I’m with you, Staci. I started writing as a kid and keep doing it even if no one ever read another piece of my work. There is still the satisfaction, as there always was, of writing for myself. Glad you enjoyed the post.

      Liked by 5 people

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